GroggyGrognard

consimworld:

Day in History: 23 July

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historicaltimes:

The Guns of August: The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Classic About the Outbreak of World War I
In this landmark, Pulitzer Prize–winning account, renowned historian Barbara W. Tuchman re-creates the first month of World War I: thirty days in the summer of 1914 that determined the course of the conflict, the century, and ultimately our present world.

historicaltimes:

The Guns of August: The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Classic About the Outbreak of World War I

In this landmark, Pulitzer Prize–winning account, renowned historian Barbara W. Tuchman re-creates the first month of World War I: thirty days in the summer of 1914 that determined the course of the conflict, the century, and ultimately our present world.

fleurdulys:

Home Again - John Atkinson Grimshaw
1879

fleurdulys:

Home Again - John Atkinson Grimshaw

1879

consimworld:

Day in History: 15 July

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consimworld:

Day in History: 3 July

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clevermove:

Dice shaming is awesome. And we put together a gallery of some of the best from the past week.

clevermove:

Dice shaming is awesome. And we put together a gallery of some of the best from the past week.

the-blood-of-history:

The Battle of Austerlitz, also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of Napoleon’s greatest victories, where the French Empire effectively crushed the Third Coalition. On 2 December 1805, a French army, commanded by Emperor Napoleon I, decisively defeated a Russo-Austrian army, commanded by Tsar Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, after nearly nine hours of difficult fighting. The battle took place near Austerlitz that time in the Austrian Empire (present day Czech Republic). 
The French victory at Austerlitz effectively brought the Third Coalition to an end. On 26 December 1805, Austria and France signed the Treaty of Pressburg, which took Austria out of both the war and the Coalition, while it reinforced the earlier treaties of Campo Formio and of Lunéville between the two powers. The treaty confirmed the Austrian cession of lands in Italy and Bavaria to France, and in Germany to Napoleon’s German allies, imposed an indemnity of 40 million francs on the defeated Habsburgs, and allowed the defeated Russian troops free passage, with their arms and equipment, through hostile territories and back to their home soil. Victory at Austerlitz also permitted the creation of the Confederation of the Rhine, a collection of German states intended as a buffer zone between France and central Europe.
As a direct consequence of these events, the Holy Roman Empire ceased to exist when, in 1806, Holy Roman Emperor Francis II abdicated the imperial throne, keeping Francis I of Austria as his only official title. These achievements, however, did not establish a lasting peace on the continent. Prussian worries about growing French influence in Central Europe sparked the War of the Fourth Coalition in 1806.

the-blood-of-history:

The Battle of Austerlitz, also known as the Battle of the Three Emperors, was one of Napoleon’s greatest victories, where the French Empire effectively crushed the Third Coalition. On 2 December 1805, a French army, commanded by Emperor Napoleon I, decisively defeated a Russo-Austrian army, commanded by Tsar Alexander I and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, after nearly nine hours of difficult fighting. The battle took place near Austerlitz that time in the Austrian Empire (present day Czech Republic).

The French victory at Austerlitz effectively brought the Third Coalition to an end. On 26 December 1805, Austria and France signed the Treaty of Pressburg, which took Austria out of both the war and the Coalition, while it reinforced the earlier treaties of Campo Formio and of Lunéville between the two powers. The treaty confirmed the Austrian cession of lands in Italy and Bavaria to France, and in Germany to Napoleon’s German allies, imposed an indemnity of 40 million francs on the defeated Habsburgs, and allowed the defeated Russian troops free passage, with their arms and equipment, through hostile territories and back to their home soil. Victory at Austerlitz also permitted the creation of the Confederation of the Rhine, a collection of German states intended as a buffer zone between France and central Europe.

As a direct consequence of these events, the Holy Roman Empire ceased to exist when, in 1806, Holy Roman Emperor Francis II abdicated the imperial throne, keeping Francis I of Austria as his only official title. These achievements, however, did not establish a lasting peace on the continent. Prussian worries about growing French influence in Central Europe sparked the War of the Fourth Coalition in 1806.

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Study in an abandoned mansion. Photo by Iris Beukhof

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Study in an abandoned mansion. Photo by Iris Beukhof

seenontabletop:

After watching the Tsuro of the Seas episode I immediately ordered a copy from Amazon. When it arrived I was shattered to discover that the dragon tiles were just cards and not raised like the ones seen on tabletop.
I checked out the HD footage and saw that they had made their own and I happened to have a woodworking shop. 
I made some square tiles out of laminated maple, glued the Tsuro tiles on and sanded the edges flush. A bit of oil paint mixed to match the Dragons (Oil will stay brighter and give a smooth finish) I had something that looked infinitely better. Thanks to Wil for responding to some emails with my questions about the tiles as well :)

seenontabletop:

After watching the Tsuro of the Seas episode I immediately ordered a copy from Amazon. When it arrived I was shattered to discover that the dragon tiles were just cards and not raised like the ones seen on tabletop.

I checked out the HD footage and saw that they had made their own and I happened to have a woodworking shop. 

I made some square tiles out of laminated maple, glued the Tsuro tiles on and sanded the edges flush. A bit of oil paint mixed to match the Dragons (Oil will stay brighter and give a smooth finish) I had something that looked infinitely better. 

Thanks to Wil for responding to some emails with my questions about the tiles as well :)

theartistsmanifesto:

Blackman Street, London by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1855)

theartistsmanifesto:

Blackman Street, London by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1855)