GroggyGrognard

iluminacje:

Ivan Aivazovsky. Because I love ships, sea and Ivan Aivazovsky.

creese:

Michael Creese, Acoustic Guitar (2010), oil on canvas.

creese:

Michael Creese, Acoustic Guitar (2010), oil on canvas.

cinemagorgeous:

Beautiful art by Ling Xiang.

mst3quote:

Mike Nelson: The HOTTEST Garfield episode ever!
Tom Servo: Puppy with a Nunchaku!
Crow T. Robot: Dik-Dik with Brass Knuckles! 
Mike Nelson: Yak with a Kentucky Long Rifle! 
Crow T. Robot: Hamster who Writes a Strong Letter to the Times!
(Episode 615 Kitten With A Whip)

mst3quote:

Mike Nelson: The HOTTEST Garfield episode ever!

Tom Servo: Puppy with a Nunchaku!

Crow T. Robot: Dik-Dik with Brass Knuckles! 

Mike Nelson: Yak with a Kentucky Long Rifle! 

Crow T. Robot: Hamster who Writes a Strong Letter to the Times!

(Episode 615 Kitten With A Whip)

mrsachmo:

Follow the link to read an article about a B-17 crew in England around 1944-1945.

I’d like to share with you what would be considered in the car world to be a “barn find” — something of great value you didn’t know was there, assumed to be gone forever. This is the story of my grandfather’s B-17 crew, based on a journal and photos found in his attic after his passing away.
On June 25th 1944, ten brave young men began training together at Ardmore, Oklahoma. Two months later, they picked up a Boeing B-17-G in Lincoln, Nebraska, with orders to deliver it to Burtonwood Air Depot at Cheshire, England. The pilots, Bill Whitehead (back row, 1st on the left) and Sully Sullivan (back row, 2nd from left) had a combined total of 250 hours in the cockpit. My grandfather, Gene “Hack” Hackney (back row, 3rd from left) was the Navigator. From Lincoln, they refueled in Grenier Field, New Hampshire, Goose Bay in Labrador, and Reykjavik. Hack’s crew was part of the Eighth Air Force, 385th Bomber Group and stationed at a base called Great Ashfield, at Elmswell, England.

http://flightclub.jalopnik.com/the-tale-of-the-b-17-blind-date-crew-1561993381/1563881866/+matthardigree

mrsachmo:

Follow the link to read an article about a B-17 crew in England around 1944-1945.

I’d like to share with you what would be considered in the car world to be a “barn find” — something of great value you didn’t know was there, assumed to be gone forever. This is the story of my grandfather’s B-17 crew, based on a journal and photos found in his attic after his passing away.

On June 25th 1944, ten brave young men began training together at Ardmore, Oklahoma. Two months later, they picked up a Boeing B-17-G in Lincoln, Nebraska, with orders to deliver it to Burtonwood Air Depot at Cheshire, England. The pilots, Bill Whitehead (back row, 1st on the left) and Sully Sullivan (back row, 2nd from left) had a combined total of 250 hours in the cockpit. My grandfather, Gene “Hack” Hackney (back row, 3rd from left) was the Navigator. From Lincoln, they refueled in Grenier Field, New Hampshire, Goose Bay in Labrador, and Reykjavik. Hack’s crew was part of the Eighth Air Force, 385th Bomber Group and stationed at a base called Great Ashfield, at Elmswell, England.

http://flightclub.jalopnik.com/the-tale-of-the-b-17-blind-date-crew-1561993381/1563881866/+matthardigree

historicaltimes:

"The Battle of the Capes" by V. Vzeg.
skipperbob:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Chesapeake
I will still do this even though there don’t appear to be any rules anymore.

historicaltimes:

"The Battle of the Capes" by V. Vzeg.

skipperbob:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Chesapeake

I will still do this even though there don’t appear to be any rules anymore.

humanoidhistory:

Fantastic.

historicaltimes:

Battle of Jena–Auerstedt Napoleon reviewing the Imperial Guard

historicaltimes:

Battle of Jena–Auerstedt Napoleon reviewing the Imperial Guard

bigboard:

Reluctant Enemies seen in the wild